Ahhh! Space Bees!

beehiveC1

Oh no…no…no…no…no…this can’t be…look! Space bees! They flew across vast galactic territories and humanity is about to get stung!

Okay. I’ll stop.

This is a classic image of the Beehive Cluster, an open cluster of stars, residing somewhere within the constellation of Cancer. This astronomical beehive is fairly easy to locate, especially under dark skies (apparent magnitude 3.7). Shining with a collective glow of at least a thousand suns—the Beehive Cluster is relatively young—especially compared to the sun. These cosmic bees are estimated to be only about 600 million years old….what? Don’t look at me like that! 600 million years is sure as shit pretty damn young…right?

Yes! Our sun is…what? 4. blah blah billion years old? Yeah. We heard it all before.

The image featured in this post was a test-shot, which was taken with a Orion 70mm Multi-Finder telescope. No Guiding. Little processing. What you see is what you get. Kind of. The photograph was converted to monochrome and the JPEG was dodged, screened, and a few other minor adjustments.

Are you ready to spy on a bunch of moody cosmic bees? Wait! Are you allergic? Don’t get too close. Just in case.

Beehivecrop1

Beehive Cluster (Crop)

Yup. Cosmic bees. Swarming. As predicted.

The Beehive Cluster is a premium target for binoculars. A 10×50 binocular comfortably fits the cluster within the field of view and you’ll become awed by the Beehive Cluster’s shimmering brilliance. Trust me. My image failed to capture the true beauty of this open star cluster. I highly recommend seeing it with your own two eyes. You know. Outside. At night. In the real wold (I hate that show).

Sure sure: the Beehive Cluster may not be as trendy as the Pleiades, but hey? Guess what? The Pleiades don’t have any mother@#$%!%$ bees.

So there.

** Image Specifications **

  • Telescope: Orion 70mm Multi-Finder
  • Tracking: Unguided
  • Exposure Time: 4 seconds
  • ISO: 1600
  • Objective Lens: 70mm
  • Focal Ratio: f/3.9
  • Focal Length: 279mm
  • Mount: German Equatorial

Processing: Monochrome Conversion, Dodged, and Screened (layers)

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,438 other followers

About FlyTrapMan (199 Articles)
I have no idea what I'm doing.

12 Comments on Ahhh! Space Bees!

  1. Great stuff… considering you needed 4 seconds exposure , your shot hardly shows any movement cause of lack of tracking. Interesting stuff..I leave all the banter aside as it goes over my head! The universe is something out of this world amazing…we had a few stars showing last night, rare event here in the UK, for all of 5 minutes..hmmm I just got to see the stars as they should be seen some time soon before it is too late! Bee Gees and Stars is a good one!! xx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks! There’s some trailing, but the telescope has a fast focal ratio, which produces a brighter image — so the trailing may not seem very apparent.

      Even though the image is unguided, an aligned equatorial mount can get away with really quick unguided exposures.

      I’m glad you were granted a chance to see some stars! Judging by the images you take — the fog and clouds seem to love you! Haha.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. This is the kind of post Sting or the Bee Gees would really groove to cuz of their names and they’re also stars!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Great images, great post. Might want to lay off the lysergic. (I mean me, not you. Okay, I meant you, too.)

    Liked by 1 person

Say something. Come on. You know you want to.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: